What to Wear for The Mud Run

[Part Two of a Three-Part Article on the Mud Run]

Thanks for the tips on how to train for the Mud Run, but what do I wear?  Well, let’s start from the top and work our way down.

Head Wear nothing.  DON’T wear glasses, sunglasses, goggles, hats, headbands or anything else on your head.  You will almost certainly go completely underwater several times and are just asking to lose anything like this.  Neckties and capes might make a fine fashion statement but safety nerd me sees them as a choke hazard.

Wait, what if I’m blind without my glasses?  Join the club.  I wear a pair of disposable contacts during the race.  Afterwards, I make sure to have a bottle of saline to flush my eyes and my glasses in the car.  I’ve just closed my eyes before dunking my head during the race and it has worked fine so far.  I do have to admit if mud works its way under the contact is isn’t fun, but I don’t know a better option other than Lasik.  Goggles would be a disaster.

Ok, let’s continue with the list.

Chest Some guys go shirtless and some women wear a sports bra.  These are usually the folks that are photographed the most.  The vast majority of people wear a team shirt.  I recommend a technical T (polyester) instead of cotton (alternate Amazon link).  They stain just as bad as cotton (a badge of honor) but they dry a lot faster which means they have the potential to weigh less during the race.  On top of that, they are cheap and durable.  You can get them in a multitude of colors from Target for about $7 at the time of this writing.

Technical T Sheds Water Quicker

Legs If you are running an Original Mud Run event (like the Jacksonville MS Mud Run), you will be required to wear long durable pants.  Do not be tempted to purchase cotton military/camo pants.  Those things turn into lead bricks when they get wet and the pockets fill with water.  You’ll sound like a kid’s swimming pool and be 10 pounds heavier after the first water obstacle.

Instead, I recommend something that doesn’t absorb any water at all.  Our team uses 100% nylon hiking pants.  They are extremely lightweight, absorb no water, and the pockets are mesh on the inside.  We’ve worn them multiple times hiking and through two Mud Runs and they show zero signs of wear.  They come with a nylon webbing belt (handy for keeping them around your waist instead of your ankles).  They are cheap too.  We got ours at REI’s Outlet website for about $14.  You can currently buy the exact same pants at Gander Mountain for about $20 (alternate Amazon link).

100% Nylon Pants – Tough & No Water Absorption

NOTE:  If you do end up with water-trapping pockets, you can either poke holes in the bottom of them or remove them completely.

No matter how tempting, do not tie or velcro the drawstring at the bottom of your pants or, worse, duct tape them closed.  Water will work its way into your pant legs and will remain trapped making lovely ankle weights.

Feet Get socks taller than your boots but as short as possible.  The taller the socks, the more water they’ll hold when wet and the heavier they’ll be.  We wear hiking socks that are made out of a blend of different kinds of fibers.  Some folks like 100% wool.  Whatever you do, avoid cotton socks as they will promote blisters.

Hiking Socks – Thick – Not Too Tall – No Cotton

Again, assuming you are running an Original Mud Run event, you will be required to wear over the ankle boots if you plan to run competitively.  For 2011, they allowed non-competitive teams to run in shoes instead of boots but I don’t know if this exemption will be permanent (everyone had to have boots in 2010).  Whatever the case, you want to wear boots

But why do I need to wear boots?
1.  It’s part of the rules.
2.  Ankle support.
3.  Aggressive treads give better traction.
4.  Shoes will get sucked off your feet and eaten by the mud.

I’ve lived in Florida for many years and I was unaware of just how sticky the mud can be around here.  In some of the deeper mud obstacles it feels like you are dragging small children that are actively trying to pry your shoes off your feet.  Do everyone a favor and wear boots so you don’t have to stop and dig your shoes out of the mud.

You can go with combat boots but there are much cheaper, lighter and more comfortable options available.  You don’t need world-class hiking boots or bomb-proof work boots.  Think high-top basketball shoe with an aggressive tread for gripping slippery ground and you are shopping in the right direction.

We purchased ours at Rack Room Shoes for about $13 on sale.  Others have had success at Target.  This is not world-class footwear by any means but it has held up for two runs.  Admittedly, the super cheap insoles have started to dissolve now that they have been washed twice but they are still functional and will be used again next year.

Cheap-o Boots – Light – No Break in Period – Over the Ankle

Do not wait until the last minute to buy your boots either.  For the last two years, places around town have sold out in the weeks just before the race.  We had one teammate who had to resort to a pair of leather steel-shank work boots.  Those things weighed more than Melanie and my boots combine and they blistered her feet so badly that she was more comfortable running in her socks.

What about esprit de corps?  That definitely factors in to your clothing.  Unlike most other races in Jax, costumes/uniforms are the norm not the exception for the Mud Run.  They don’t have to be expensive.  Just come up with a name and a look that reflects the spirit of the team.

We’ve always taken the cheapest route with a white shirt that has our team logo screen printed on it (do it yourself) but some teams will wear an entire matching uniform.  They range from the serious police and fire fighter teams to the silly.  We’ve run with guys in business suits and a man and woman team dressed as bride and groom.

On a personal note, because the race is “dirty” folks feel the need to come up with extremely crude names.  Maybe I’m becoming an old man, but when I see names that aren’t even a play on a crude word or sex act but are the actual words verbatim, I’m not happy.  Spend just a little time thinking about your name before you sign up and I think you’ll come up with something much funnier than team “Hey, We Smell Like @#$%.”

It bears repeating.  Figure out your team name before you go online to sign up for the race, Mr. Team Captain.  I imagine that a lot of people don’t think through the fact that they are going to have to provide a team name when they are registering until they are halfway through the process and then they pop in the first thought that crosses their mind.

Ok, Mr. Sensitive.  I’ll work out my team name before I sign up.  Any other gear to consider?  I strongly recommend wearing good waterproof sunscreen.  You’ll also want a complete change of clothes, a plastic bag for your dirties and two junky towels – one to dry off with and one to sit on for the ride home.

I suppose you could wear gloves but you don’t really need them.  Your knees will probably get a little chewed up when you crawl around but kneepads would just get in the way.  Leave them at home.

If you’ve got some favorite piece of equipment for the Mud Run that I’ve not mentioned, be sure to list it in the comments below.

The third and final installment will be coming soon.  I’ll wrap things up with a few miscellaneous tips for the making the most of the Mud Run.

You can find all of my other mud run articles here.

Advertisements

2011 MS Society Jacksonville Mud Run Recap and Pictures

If you’ve been following along since the beginning, you know that Melanie, I and a few other friends ran in Mud Run last year.  We had such a good time that we almost immediately began making plans for the next one.

Fast forward to 2011.  The response to the pictures and stories from last year led us to create two teams this year.  Because the Mud Run changed the categories, we opted for a five-man competitive team and a five-woman competitive team.

Once we arrived at the course, we found out that the categories weren’t the only things that had changed.   In fact, just about every aspect of the race this year was improved:  better parking, better start/finish area, better course, better spectator consideration, better food and better organization.

They still need to work on orientation/check-in.  We wandered around for a while before we figured out where to go.  The equestrian center is a large piece of property that can easily swallow several thousand people in its wooded bowels.  This year they had changing tents (no more hunkering down behind your car after the race) but they were located halfway between anywhere useful.  If they really want the community to get behind this event they need to do even more to make it spectator friendly.  I would suggest a short dry spectator trail to get them to the key points of interest along the course.  I’d also give them a map.  Finally, they need better results reporting.  At any other race I’ve ever participated in you get the results almost in real time.  As of the time of this posting, I still don’t have our official time or a listing of the top finishers.

That is the end of my belly aching.  Everything else was really great.  We even got free Bubba Burgers at the end of the run.  Yum!

As for the race itself, it was comparable to last year but wasn’t as hot out of the water, not as cold in the water, the sticky mud was much shallower and the course was a little easier.  My trusty $13 boots came through the race just fine again (although I’m noticing a small amount of upper and sole separation on the right one).  Unfortunately, running in those things hurts my feet.  I noticed the next day that my feet were a little swollen and the bottoms hurt a little.  I also got  shin splints on my right leg.  I think both of these are directly related to the lack of padding in my boots.  I’ll heal up just fine I’m sure and it is a small price to pay to have this much fun.

On a side note about the boots, we were not allowed to duct tape our boots closed as we said we would last year (see 2010 post).  It turned out to be a non-issue.  There wasn’t gravel in the water or mud pits so none of us ended up getting junk stuck inside our boots this year.

We will not be doing the Donna Breast Cancer Marathon next year so that means we’ll be able to dedicate time to training specifically for this race.  The advice I got last year is still good for this year:  run stairs.  I think that is the best thing you can do to get ready for this event.

I can hardly wait for next year.

The following pictures are copyright Sam Moore (Thank you so much for doing this!) and are used here with the artist’s permission.  This is not the entire course but gives a good overall impression.